Listening To The Orchestra Kitty Barne

ISBN: 9780836981469

Published: December 31st 1941

Hardcover

205 pages


Description

Listening To The Orchestra  by  Kitty Barne

Listening To The Orchestra by Kitty Barne
December 31st 1941 | Hardcover | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, RTF | 205 pages | ISBN: 9780836981469 | 7.52 Mb

I STEM IMG TO THE ORCHESTRA by KITTY BARNE THE BOBBS-MERRILL COMPANY P UB L I S H E R S INDIANAPOLIS NEW YORK. Cp UGHT, 1946, BY MARION CATHERINE STREATFEILD PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA First Edition Courtesy of the National BroadcastingMoreI STEM IMG TO THE ORCHESTRA by KITTY BARNE THE BOBBS-MERRILL COMPANY P UB L I S H E R S INDIANAPOLIS NEW YORK.

Cp UGHT, 1946, BY MARION CATHERINE STREATFEILD PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA First Edition Courtesy of the National Broadcasting i TOSCANINI CONDUCTS THE NBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA S. M-H. Music lover Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears . . . THE MERCHANT OF VENICE Prelude THIS book is Sir Philip Sidneys handful of grapes to induce a visit to the vineyard. It is an offering to the more humble music lover to the infrequent concertgoer who knows nothing of music except his joy in it. It is for the large and undistinguished audience, the middle and near-middle brows, who get their music mechanically or not at all who seldom hear any discussion on music who have not the language, and find books and articles on the subject distressingly full of unknown words but who cry with the poet My little skill, My passionate will Are here where art thou because they know music is as necessary to them as the air they breathe.

We amateur listeners do not love great music until we know it, and with our untrained ears that means many hearings. Only when we know it can we take part in it as we listen. Only then are we like Keats watching his bird if a sparrow comes before my window I take part in his existence and pick about the gravel. So we build up a precious collection, pursuing our symphony, lover like, from radio to phonograph, from phonograph to con cert hall, adding to our store year by year. Here it is that this small book may help. We enjoy our symphony con cert a hundred times more if we have a working knowl edge of the orchestra, that superb instrument played to us by its conductor also if we have read enough musical history to get an idea of how music grew slowly, in evitably,, unfolding its beauties as it towered up, like some great forest tree and finally, if we know something of the life and labors of the great masters, and how the master pieces came to be written.

Great music is like drama besides the composer and performer it must have a third element for complete ex istence. To create another Vienna, another Paris, is to create audiences who have learned to listen, to appraise, to welcome the new as well as to venerate the old, to enjoy music with every faculty, not only the emotions.

This book is an offering to the apprentices, the beginners in this most difficult art of listening. Here neither history nor dollars, nor even an intensive education in musical matters, can show a short cut to perfection what it needs is time well spent in the concert hall, at the piano, beside the radio and the phonograph, in digging out the illuminating com ments and inferences that lie between the pages of a book, in encouraging the slow but sure growth of what our fathers rightly called a soul for music.

America has arrived but lately into the great world of music. Her journey there with her musical pioneers, char acters every one of them, thrusting vigorously forward, getting their music somehow, insisting on it, forcing it on their hearers by fair means or foul, making them willy nilly sit still and attend, makes fascinating reading. They were not only musicians, those early American composers, they were people with a mission, and their mission was nothing less than the creation of a musical public.

They did it, as is Americas way, with incredible speed, taking a hundred years where others have taken five hundred, though, like Father Heinrich, too often their only wealth when they came to die lay in several large chests full of original compositions.

Their works are rightly forgotten long since, but they themselves should be remembered...



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